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A REPORT FOR A TWO DAY HUMAN TRAFFICKING CONSULTATIVE WORKSHOP HELD AT NAIROBI BAPTIST CHURCH

EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE OF KENYA IN PARTNERSHIP WITH MICAH GLOBAL RELIGIOUS LEADERS TAKING ACTION FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN

ON 22ND AND 23RD NOV., 2018.
REPORT COMPILED BY EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE OF KENYA Rev. Connie Kivuti Evangelical Alliance of Kenya P.O. Box 20571- 00100 Nairobi Email: secretariat@eakenya.org Mobile: +254706444714

ACRONYMS
AEA – Association of Evangelicals in Africa
CBOs – Community Based Organizations
CEO – Chief Executive Officer
CS – Cabinet Secretary
CSW – Commercial Sex Workers
EAC – East Africa Community
EAK – Evangelical Alliance of Kenya
FGM – Female Genital Mutilation
HIV – Human Immune Deficiency Virus
HT – Human Trafficking
H/R – Human Rights
IEC – Information, Education and Communication
IJM – International Justice Mission
IOM – International Organization Of Migration
IP – Inter Parties
KNC – Kenya National Constitution
KNCHR – Kenya National Commission For Human Rights
NGOs – Non Governmental Organizations
PACWA – Pan African Christian Women Alliance
RSD – Refugees Strategic Director
SAAG – Social Action Governance and Advocacy
STIs – Sexually Transmitted Diseases
UN – United Nations
UNHCR – United Nations High Commission for Refugees
US – United States
________________________________________________________________

1.0: INTRODUCTION: HUMAN TRAFFICKING CONSULATIVE WORKSHOP
Evangelical Alliance of Kenya in partnership with MICAH Global held a two days Consultative Workshop on the vice of Human Trafficking on 22nd and 23rd November 2018 at CITAM Valley Rd from 8am to 4:30pm daily.
The workshop sought to bring together key stakeholders, both State and Non State Actors and organizations involved with the elimination of human trafficking. The Workshop provided a forum for sharing experiences from East, West, Southern Africa as well as Germany.
Human trafficking is a major issue of concern especially in this 21st Century, and this vice has many drivers, key among them poverty and ignorance. According to United Nations 2014, human trafficking is generally understood to refer to the process through which individuals are placed or maintained in an exploitative situation for economic gain. Women, men and children are trafficked for a range of purposes, including forced and exploitative labour in factories, farms and private households, sexual exploitation, and forced marriage. Trafficking affects all regions and most countries of the world.

2.0: BACKGROUND
Evangelical Alliance of Kenya and MICAH Global held this consultative workshop in support of the efforts in eliminating Human Trafficking and in contributing towards the agreed conclusions adopted during the 62nd Session of CSW 2018, under the third area: Implement economic and social policies for the empowerment of all rural women and girls, where the Commission outlined policies and actions to be under-taken by Governments and other stakeholders, as follows:
Devise, strengthen and implement comprehensive anti-trafficking strategies that integrate a human rights and sustainable development perspective, and enforce, as appropriate, legal framework, in a gender- and age-sensitive manner, to combat and eliminate all forms of trafficking in persons, raise public awareness of the issue of trafficking in persons, in particular women and girls, take measures to reduce the vulnerability of women and girls to modern slavery and sexual exploitation, provide access, as applicable, to protection and reintegration assistance to victims of trafficking in persons and enhance international cooperation, inter alia, to counter, with a view to eliminating, the demand that fosters all forms of exploitation, including sexual exploitation and forced labour.

3.0: SITUATION ANALYSIS
The role of the church in Human Trafficking and Human rights
The shocking reality is that more and more people in our generation are being bought and sold for forced labour, sexual exploitation, slavery, domestic servitude, organized crime and even the transactions of organs. People seeking a way out of poverty or hoping for better opportunities are deceived, entrapped and exploited. Human trafficking dehumanizes individuals who are bearers of God’s image and it violates their God given worthy and dignity. The conveyor belt of trafficking requires an integrated and concerted effort from the church to prevent, protect, rescue and restore victims, alongside advocating for a clear process for prosecution of perpetrators and those complicit in these crimes.
A number of factors come together to create the perfect storm for trafficking to thrive. These are: poverty, limited access to healthcare and education, gender inequalities, conflict, high unemployment, and a general lack of opportunities, especially for women. Recognizing the web that evolves to trap people into trafficked situations requires the church to address root causes, including gender inequality and violence, as well as to respond to all the dimensions involved in trafficking. Kenya as a nation plays a triad role as a source, a destination and as a transit country as far human trafficking is concerned. This calls for serious interventions.

4.0: NATIONAL DIALOGUE ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING
The consultative workshop at Baptist Church brought key groups on the table of dialogue and these included:

A. GOVERNMENT
1. Prof. Margaret Kobia’s office, CS Ministry of Public Service Gender and Youth Affairs
2. Human Trafficking Government related Commissions
3. Ms Mary Kezia – Assistant Labour Commissioner, Ministry of Labour
4. Ms Claris Murugi – Attorney General’s office

B. PRESENTERS
1. Stephen Olang – Church – Community and Community Relations Director, International Justice Mission
2. Moses Wangunyu – World Vision
3. Ms. Catherine Wangunyu – Compassion International
4. Sandra Martner – Allianzmission – Germany
5. Winnie Mutevu – HAART
6. Radoslaw Malinowski – HAART
7. Anne Makumi – Salvation Army
8. Mr. Daniel Kamphuis, Seniour RSD Officer UNHCR
9. Joseph Bonyonte for Dr. Benard Mogesa – CEO, Kenya National Human Rights Commission
10. Ms. Lucy Mutuku – IOM

C. CLERGY AND CHURCH LEADERS
THEME FOR THE WORKSHOP: CREATING NETWORKS AND DEVISING STRATEGIES ON HOW TO RUN AN EFFECTIVE ANTI-HUMAN TRAFFICKING CAMPAIGN IN KENYA

OPENING CEREMONY: Ministry of Public Service Youth and Gender, Madam Verity Mghanga, for CS Hon. Margaret Kobia CLOSING CEREMONY: Hon. Sabina Chege, Kenya National Assembly

4.1 – OBJECTIVES OF THE WORKSHOP
• Provide a place of dialogue where we can all share our knowledge and experiences of human trafficking.
• Provide a context for reflection and consultation on the issues surrounding human trafficking.
• Raise awareness and expose the issues of human trafficking
• Dialogue around theological reflection on trafficking, root causes in society and how the church can be a catalyst for change at all levels (community, national and regional)
• Develop a strategy on anti human trafficking
• Develop a coalition of partners and individuals committed to addressing human trafficking in all its dimensions in an integrated and holistic way.

4.2 – THE RISKS
One of the main challenges to prosecution of human trafficking offenders has been the inadequacy of the legal framework with respect to trafficking crimes. The Ministry concerned with Justice is key in giving a picture of the legal frame work in Kenya, and the other risk factors.
Human trafficking cannot be viewed in isolation from child protection concerns or gender based violence incidence, such as high levels of rape/defilement, child labour, sexual exploitation, early marriage and neglect, particularly of orphaned children. Most of our communities have a huge problem of children living or found begging on the streets. These children are highly vulnerable to abuse and trafficking. Community based protection mechanisms are yet to be fully developed to respond to child protection concerns. In fact, community members remain largely unaware of child protection and associated legislation. Voices of national leaders addressing violence against children, vulnerable adults and gender based violence are not heard regularly and many law enforcement agencies are ignorant of some harmful cultural practices. Children themselves are not always believed. This ‘silence’ and denial around abuse, particularly sexual abuse is prevalent in communities. Reporting of incidences is low and children rarely speak out.

A concerted and integrated effort is required to address this rapidly evolving problem of human trafficking. From Awareness, prevention, protection, prosecution and recovery – we need to close the gaps and together root out this abominable practice

4.3 – GOAL
The Goal of Human Trafficking Workshop was to bring together stakeholders, both State and Non-State actors and the church to cub this vice

4.4 – PURPOSE
To bring together and engage stakeholders as far as human trafficking arena is concerned. These include State, non- State actors; Key Evangelical Bishops, women, and the youth.

4.5 – INPUTS
Identify the basic place to begin in terms of making interventions towards this vice. Identifying all the key stakeholders involved in human trafficking. Planning a two days consultative workshop to begin an engagement with them. Develop networks to enable create a movement to fight this vice. Develop strategies of how to make the movement and the campaign sustainable.

4.6 – OUTPUTS
• Creating a joint roadmap between the Church, State actors and other Non State actors to cub this vice of human trafficking.
• Developing networks of like-minded pastors who have zeal to fight the vice of human trafficking.
• Developing clear strategies to build capacity of individuals, to have wherewithal to become champions for change as far the human trafficking issue is concerned.

4.7 – OUTCOMES
• A sensitized church and populace on human trafficking issues.
• Increased capacity to fight the vice.
• More channels for reporting cases.
• Enactment of clear laws, policies and guidelines against the vice.
• Sealed loopholes that enhance human trafficking.

5.0: SESSION REPORTS
Day One- 22nd Nov. 2018
Opening prayer was led by Emeritus Bishop Boniface Adoyo Opening remarks were given by the EAK General Secretary Rev. Connie Kivuti
• It was noted that Kenya is in a 2nd tare country in human trafficking
• Human trafficking is in two levels internal and external
• Internal one includes rural urban migration of underage girls and children for labor
• External one involves shipping Kenyans to other countries for the sake of employment
• About 20,000 children are trafficked every year in Kenya
• Some counties in Kenya are more prone to human trafficking than others. Busia County is among the leading counties in Kenya being Border County on human trafficking issues.
• Purposes of human trafficking mainly include sex, forced and early marriages, domestic and commercial labor.
• This has contributed to increase in street families in Nairobi and big cities in Kenya
• Corruption from extended family members has contributed a great deal to this menace
Challenges faced in curtailing human trafficking
• Laws are not adequate to fight the vice
• National and regional partnership need to be formed to help to work together
• Awareness on human trafficking needs to be raised more on how to respond to victims of human trafficking
• Micah global and EAK work in partnership against human trafficking in Kenya and Africa through AEA in 31 countries.
• They challenge the religious leaders to accelerate the functioning of the workability of human trafficking in Kenya
• Some of the objectives are to look t the Kenyan laws and strengthen them
• Build a partnership with stake holders to fight the vice more effectively
Bishop Njau for EAK Chair Bishop Mark Kariuki
• Exodus 21:16 Kidnappers should be put to death
• We need to purge evil from among us
• Man was made in the image of Good. Nobody should be sold or allowed to be undignified for whatever happens
• Greed and financial gains are the major cases off human trafficking
• Kenya is a source, a transit centre as well as a destination for victim of human trafficking
• 54% of human trafficked is mainly for sex exploitation
• 34.3% f the total number of those trafficked are girls whle33% are boys between the age of 3-5years
• Children between the ages of 10-14 years are working in farms hence not in schools
• Children between 15-19 years working, among them 70.7% were girls while 65% are boys.
• Awareness needs to be raised and amplify the voice against human trafficking
• Interventions should be discussed with other stakeholders Official opening of the 2 Days Consultative Workshop

The opening ceremony was conducted by Madam Verity Mghanga, Office of the Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Public Service Gender and Youth Affairs.

Plenary Sessions Plenary 1: Stephen Olang’ Church and Community Relations Director – International Justice Mission (IJM) Topic Issues
Global Perspective on Human Trafficking (Human Trafficking Perspectives)
Began by sharing a story of a young man known as Nelson who was a victim of human trafficking and the negative impact thereafter.
• IJM calls the church to lead in the protection of the poor from violence and human trafficking
• In Asia, minors are trafficked for sexual purposes
• In India they are trafficked because of accrued loans from the great grandparents
• In South America, human trafficking happens due to Gender Based violence
• In Africa it is due to Child labor
• In Ghana, deception is used to traffic children to forced labor where they are beaten forced to work 24/7 given no food they get malnutrition and bad lives.
• The cycle continues where the victims become the offenders in future
• Communities around them deny the problem and later no solution is found
• Strategy employed by IJM
• Child protection by the church
• Prosecution of the perpetrators
• Restoration process
• Intentional Restorative prayers
• Building of rescue homes for victims
• Be the referral teams to the government and tackle the community problems
• Experiences on human trafficking issues should be shared more
• Collaborative initiatives should be supported between the church and the state like build schools, change the system to protective and prevent human trafficking issues
• Advocacy should be done to talk about issues like poverty that contribute to human trafficking
• Get success stories by beginning schools for older children kidnapped, Counseling Centers.

Plenary 2: Moses Wangunyu – World Vision Topic Issues
The Impact of Human Trafficking on Children
Gen.37:24 Joseph was sold in Egypt which is a case of human trafficking in the Bible
• Children go through traumatizing and mental cases when they are trafficked hence lack parental love. They get out of school and are denied their basic rights and often find themselves in prison. Introduction of the new cultures is never easy for them.
• Teenage pregnancy happens too. 21% countrywide and 40% in Migori
• Children are trafficked to engage in drug trafficking and other criminal acts.
• Sexual violation happens where, HIV, STIs and early use and misuse of contraceptives and abortion happens to children.
• Boys trafficked are recruited as child soldiers, terror groups which end up being arrested and put in prisons
• Low self esteem later happens and children get to fear adults
Interventions by World Vision
• Talk about human trafficking in churches and to faith leaders
• Talk about safety of children.
• Teach adults about saying where they are on social media which gives the abductors an easier time
• Keep a clear track of children and where they are at all times.
• Engage completely in children matters in school boards and in societies
• Don’t expose children to dangerous teachers. Always do a background check

Plenary 3: Compassion International Representative- Catherine Wamiti- Emerging Issues Topic

Issues
Interventions and Best Practices on The Elimination of Human Trafficking of Children Collaborative approaches involve other stake holders e.g faith based organizations, government, Employers, workers, civil society groups. Strengthening families is important; advise the societies, community based workers and church to engage. Empowering stakeholders for strong participation is key Use online system to reach local and global partners Mapping and conducting of institutional analysis. Find out who does prevention of human trafficking who it is, where they are. Research more. Psalm 82:3-4. Acts 16 are cases of slave mastery in the Bible.

Educate people on human trafficking, child criminals, and on radicalization. Help children access schools and remain in them. Create more awareness on what human trafficking is and how to identify a victim of human trafficking through educating of families and congregations amongst others. Do some interventions, rescue, reintegrate, counseling, and Engage legal consultants to help more Involve all the young and the children. Government Rep. from Ministry of public service youth and gender affairs Human trafficking is about development H.T is a crime and a lucrative business done by criminal activities It is an illegal and tricky business There are over 100M migrants worldwide. 4 million are undocumented It is the modern day slavery H.T. is a threat to the society insecurity and affects social issues which bring organized abuse. It is a threat to the victims and to the entire Nation It is a gross violation of Human rights which brings even sex, violations of human rights, forced labor, adoption and even death Kenya is documented as a hub. Boundaries are porous which makes it difficult to keep them safe. Destination of the migrants is in Europe, Asia, Arab countries and parts of Africa through employment agents in search of employment. Kenya mostly facilitates migrants from neighboring countries like Ethiopia to other countries like Thailand. There are a few laws that protect human trafficking

Children’s act 2001, Sexual offenses act 2006 etc Deal with corruption Support women and girls in entrepreneurship Creation of more awareness on the media Enforce available laws to be implemented Enhance community policing Engage other partners like domestic girls in homes Enhance national policies that would strengthen 5 Ps Reduce or eradicate FGM in places like Migori where girls are taken to neighboring countries and returned after they have been violated Enhance campaigns like jitokeze campaigns. Most Kenyans go to church and can all campaign against HT. The church is at an advantage because it has facilities and it has a good reputation in the community. Develop meaningful multifaceted, multi sectoral approach of dealing with FGM Prosecution alone is not enough, prevention is better too. Community mobilization e.g. Masaai and FGM, we sensitize the chiefs, sub chiefs, nyumba 10 representatives etc.

Plenary 4: Fortuna Tioye- Pan African Christian Women Alliance (PACWA) Topic Issues
Sharing MICAH Global/ PACWA desire in regards to Human Trafficking
HT operates in the dark.
It is indeed the modern day slavery and a vice that must be completely reduced if not eliminated.

Objectives of PACWA
Provide a place of dialogue
Provide a context for reflection and consultation
Raise awareness on HT issues

Dialogue on theological reflections as far as HT is concerned
Develop policies on anti- HT (Interventions).
Network with other stakeholders to eradicate HT

Plenary 5: Sandra Mattner – AllianzMission Topic Issues
Sharing of the German Experience in line with Human Trafficking
Kenyan women go to Germany to practice prostitution, They are usually promised good jobs but end up in prostitution instead.
We need to build up relationships with the prostitutes for support.
Prostitutes in Kenya are condemned as sinners who have to repent to be loved. Jesus does not approach sinners condemningly but lovingly.
Jesus spent time with sinners and ate with them, loved them and motivated them to change.
This approach changes people and they get empowered to change the others.
Some prostitutes exist due to financial stress. AllianzMission offers job opportunities and businesses for commercial sex workers to help rehabilitate them.

Plenary 6: Winnie Mutevu- HAART Kenya Topic Issues
Impact of Human Trafficking (HAART East Africa Experience on the negative impact of Human Trafficking)
HAART was formed in 2010 and currently operates in 10 counties.
HAART helps schools and develops manuals for HT information.
First focus should be to train respondents that include the religious institutions, police, NGOs, CBOs, Churches.
Helping the victims of HT with medication, legal issues and represent them in courts is a good input that HAART undertakes, and offering of shelter for recued girls.
Enforce the law in peace, repatriation for people back to their countries.
The causes of human trafficking are greed.
Stakeholders should be educated on how to look out for traffickers
All agencies must be registered
Help the people understand the issues and report the cases

Panel Session
The panel was derived from all the organizations that were outlined to make presentation for the two days.
Key questions
1. What are the objectives of these organizations?
2. What efforts have been made so far in the fight against human trafficking?
3. What are the gaps as far as the fight against human trafficking is concerned?
4. How can we make the fight against human trafficking more impactful?
5. How can we form partnerships that can take the fight against human trafficking deeper?
6. Is it a fight that we can win?

Day 2, 23rd Nov. 2018
Plenary 7:
Daniel Camphuis, RSD Officer, United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNCHR)
Vulnerability of Refugees to Human Trafficking
UNHCR is Involved in registration of refugees.
They conduct appointment for a detailed interview with these refugees that ranges IN between 1 hour to 4 hours. A Legal assessment- Verify if they flee because of fear of prosecution or situation of violence. These are usually done by the government lawyers in Nairobi and Kakuma.

Human trafficking
Involves people crossing borders in an irregular manner hence they risk their lives in crossing the Mediterranean and other dangerous lands when going to south Africa, Mexico and Idaho
There is lots of money involved that make control difficult by the state.
Borders need to be more controlled and the lives of people improved to give people no reason to go out
Migrants and asylum seekers mostly lack information
Children are given contraceptives so that they don’t conceive just in case they are raped and are able to work well.
Primary migration happens when people are in search of basic needs
Secondary migration happens when people travel out to different countries in search of employments for economic reasons, social like to join family members and for protection reasons.

How to differentiate people getting in as migrants or refugees
• Children traveling on their own
• Trauma support is given upon arrival
• Medical support and basic needs
• Intervene when refugees are taken to court eg in asylum seeking
• When refugees are taken to the camps they fail to register with the government hence they remain unaccounted for
• Corruption by police is rampant and hence it thwarts some plans
• Asylum seekers can become migrants and migrants can become asylum seekers

UNHCR has some points of action Plan
• Corporation amongst key partners
• Data collection and analysis
• Migration protection ( keeping the borders safe)
• Reception- Screening profiling and referrals
• Differentiating processes and procedures from counties they are coming from

Solutions for refugees
Ensure all non registered refugees are registered
Make inclusive camp where refugees can live together to build their lives together
• Return some to their countries
• Some stay where they are
• Resettlement- Get legal status in the new country

Plenary 8: Claris Murugi, Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General (AG)
Existing Gaps in Legislation Framework
She read the report on what they have done in terms of freedom of right of Kenyans
-Offer legislative framework against human trafficking
They are member state of the U.N –recognize the international laws which are ratified in our constitution
Internationally, they are a member of the UN protocol to prevent and suppress violations of human rights.
This was ratified in 2005. Kenya is legally bound by the protocol which has refined our human rights
Nationally, Article 2 Sub article 5 and 6recognize the international law.
Protection of human dignity, slavery and torture (bill of rights) is found in article 28-30.
There are four rights that should never be violated at any time
• Freedom of movement
• Freedom from torture
• Freedom from slavery and forced servitude
• Right to a fair trial
Witness protection Act and Sexual Offenses Act are laws that guide HT. In Kenya
The main law is Counter Trafficking of Person’s Act of 2010
It was enacted in 2012.
It established an advisory committee
Does public awareness together with other Government agencies like the civil societies the ministry in charge plus the office of the AG

In H. T, 3 elements are to be proven.
• Act
• Need and
• Purpose
Act: Recruitment, transportation, transfer and harboring and receipt
Means: Force, kidnap, lies or deception, payment etc
Purpose: Exploitation, forced labor, sexual exploitation,
For children being trafficked, the above elements don’t need t be proven
Ministry of labor has a Trust Fund for assisting persons of Human trafficking
Rehabilitation and medical assistance for the same
Sources of this Trust Fund is collection from criminal acts off HT accessed by the victims of H.T
Plenary 9: Patrick Bonyonte Kenya National Commission for Human Rights (KNCHR)
Human Rights Kenyan scenario…The Extent of Human Rights Abuse
KNCHR is a government entity under article 59 of the constitution
Under KNC Act of 2012
Offers protection of human rights in the country
Receives reports investigates and makes reports and submits them as ell as follow up on the recommendation given
Victims may come as individuals or as a group
They have offices in Wajir, Kisumu, Kitale, Nyahururu, Mombasa and Nairobi offices
In 2010-2018 Mandera, Wajir, Kisumu, Laikipia and Mombasa received 242 cases of HT.
It was mainly on children between 0-5 years, 6-10, 16-18 years.
Adults involved in HT do so for sex trafficking and forced labor
Intervention s done in form of fees to represent them in courts for repatriation, financial support, psycho socio support like for Ethiopians and Rwandees

They also offer advice to government monitoring aspects and application of international laws.
Enhancing capacity of the people trafficking, training of the employees and stakeholders involved in HT, recruiting agencies and provide necessary information
Monitor places of detention like prisons and cells and see how victims are being treated, interpret law
Monitor orphanages where about 80% of children in them have parents or extended family members
Recommend that such orphanages be closed
Donors need to support children from their homes
Check why beggars in KENYA come from other countries
HT has a lot of cartels, it’s a money bag for many it needs concerted efforts to fight it
Come up with sustainable ways of helping victims
Build government shelters on top of cells and prisons where the trained staff can handle the victims better
Trust fund needs money allocation

Plenary 10: Lucy Mutuku International Organization for Migration (IOM) Topic Issues
Response to the Victims of HT, Migrants and refugees and their protection
Components of response
• Individual
• Family
• Society
When assisting, assist all affected not one or some

3 principles
• Right to human right
• Right to physical, mental and social wellbeing
• Sustainability of the same

There are 40 million victims of forced labor and marriage
Out of that number, 7000-8000 have been helped
There are20- 30 countries who accept refugees including US and others
US has helped over 100,000. Compared to the 10 M. migrants it is not still doing enough.
The UN helps the migrants get qualified labor and scholarships, offer them advisory and
Information strategies – give them information that will help them through.
All these rights must be presented at the court even for kidnappers
Their story keeps changing whenever they are in courts.
There is no up to date data from all the other stakeholders doing that work of dealing with human trafficking.
The challenge comes during the identification
Victims are made comfortable not to know they are victims of trafficking
They are not easy to identify because they are too traumatized through what they went

Regional Responses
Capacity building should be done to the people manning the borders
Migration profile should be handled well.
Equip ports of entry and secure porous boarders
Work with other stakeholders
Reduce internal chaos.
Run media campaigns like the one that ran in 2009-2011

Gaps found in Law Enforcement
1. Evidence- Proving of 3elements of victim testimony, documentary or real evidence
2. Low conviction cases. In 2014 out of 128 countries with Human trafficking cases only 15% had been convicted
3. Enforcement of the law.
4. Corruption of traffickers
5. Proper co-ordination of the stake holders
6. Lack of awareness and sensitization for protection purposes
7. Lack of funding by the government
8. Lack of proper training for prosecutors

How to Identify the victims of H.T
• Vulnerability screening
• If he or she is a victim, do another screening
• Process the travel documents for them
• Grant them reintegration package
• Offer Psycho- socio support
• Offer temporary shelters
• Make referral to counseling

8 Principles to direct assistance for the victims
• Respect the H/R of the victim of HT
• Have their consent to be assisted
• Apply principle of non discrimination
• Practice privacy and confidentiality
• Self determination and integration
• Treatment and care
• Offer comprehensive approach to assistance ie health, legal assistance basic needs etc
• Have the best interest of the victim.

Group Break Away (Group Work) Group 1 to 4

Group 1
Question 1 As you think about Kenya, what thoughts and feelings come to mind regarding Human Trafficking Situation?
Responses
• It is a National disaster
• Seal the information gap by making it available to all
• Intervene between the citizens and the law enforcers in our borders
• Cultural beliefs misguide us
• Children are the most affected
• Kenya’s geographical position makes it more vulnerable to HT
• Kenyans support HT directly or indirectly
• Open border entry makes it easy for HT to happen
• Poverty is a major contributor to HT
• Gender disparity is a contributor
• Parental negligence is also a contributor

Question 2
What social and economic conditions exist in Kenya that make your target group either vulnerable disregard or tolerate human trafficking concerns?
Responses
• Exposing children to social media
• More children in the rural areas are more exposed
• Inadequate parental care
• Societal moral degradation

Question 3
How much do you think the ordinary Kenyan knows and understands the human Trafficking
Responses
Very few people know about HT in Kenya

Question 4
What can the government do to raise awareness on HT?
Responses
• Collaborate with the community leaders , the church and influential
people in the community
• Engagement with the people with the power to make it happen
• Provide IEC materials

Question 5
What do you see as the role of the church and the larger religious community in Kenya, in combating human trafficking?
Responses
• Lobby the duty bearers to enforce the law
• Partner with other stake holders
• Provide witness protection
• Allocate enough funds for HT

Question 6.
When it comes to engagement with the human trafficking victims
• What do you think are their needs
• How should the Church, society and government respond to these needs
• Provide shelter, health, psycho-socio support, education, basic needs, safety, legal support reintegration to the victims of HT
• The church should provide support mechanism
• Offer linkage to the stakeholders
• Community should report HT cases around them
• Community should volunteer to be witnesses
• Come together to meet the needs of HT
• Community should stop stigmatizing the HT victims

Question 7
What strategic steps would you suggest for EAK to take in order to begin working on human trafficking in Kenya?
• Form an action team
• Partner with other stake holders
• Prepare action plan with costs
• Form a City IP consultative forum
• Provide identification, monitoring team to ensure implementation happens
• EAK to become the monitors and the government to d a follow up

Group 2
Question 1
As you think about Kenya, what thoughts and feelings come to mind regarding Human Trafficking Situation?
• The demand and the supply side of HT. Demand is cheap labor, supply is poverty and better lives
• Dealing with feelings. Ignorance, Lack of information, negligence, bad company, influence

Question 2
What social and economic conditions exist in Kenya that make your target group either vulnerable disregard or tolerate human trafficking concerns?
Social ones….Illiteracy, bad company broken families, peer and social pressure, internal and tribal clashes
Economic ones include poverty, unemployment, and corruption. Organ sales e.g in albinos, children born out of incest

Question 3
How much do you think the ordinary Kenyan knows and understands the human Trafficking
There is so much ignorance on Human Trafficking

Question 4
What can the government do to raise awareness on HT?
• Collaborate with the community leaders , the church and influential people in the community
• Engagement with the people with the power to make it happen
• Provide IEC materials
Engage media companies
Empower religious organizations and communities at large
Raise awareness at county levels schools, barazas and in chief camps.
Broaden the government partnership with other agencies
Entrench issues of HT in the school curriculums debates in schools etc
Ratify more protocols /EAC affiliations dwell on implementation

Question 5
What do you see as the role of the church and the larger religious community in Kenya, in combating human trafficking?
Educate the congregations
Reporting the perpetrators and suspects of HT
Show availability to organizations dealing with HT
Use social media and pulpit to talk about HT
Collaborate with other organizations dealing with HT
Resume, restore and rehabilitate victims
Engage government in policy making high levels

Question 6
When it comes to engagement with the human trafficking victims
• What do you think are their needs
• How should the Church, society and government respond to these needs
• Basic needs
• Counseling
• Love, accommodation compassion empathy hope
• Legal support
• Counseling and psycho socio training
• Referrals to agencies
• Link with police for consent on housing

Question 7
What strategic steps would you suggest for EAK to take in order to begin working on human trafficking in Kenya?
Whistle blowing and reporting
Empathize, encourage victims to report
Government
Provide legal aide
Offer shelter and spread them all over the country

EAK
Stakeholders mapping
Capacity building to churches and community leaders, pastors etc
Do campaigns country wide

Group 3
Question 1
As you think about Kenya, what thoughts and feelings come to mind regarding Human Trafficking Situation?
1. HT should be stopped as it lowers human dignity
2. Cripples economy
3. HT growing at a high rate
4. More awareness and training needed
5. HT is immoral and the church should pray against it
6. Address its root cause
7. Have partnership to eradicate HT
8. Address factors that contribute to HT
Put pressure on government to do more on the victims of HT

Question 2
What social and economic conditions exist in Kenya that make your target group either vulnerable disregard or tolerate human trafficking concerns?
Poverty
Modern emerging ways of new systems
Lapse of security- no capacity to identify culprits
Unemployment and lack of better opportunities
Peer pressure
Naivety/ignorance
Poor parenting standards
Question 3 How much do you think the ordinary Kenyan knows and understands the human Trafficking
0-10% know about HT in Kenya

Question 4
What can the government do to raise awareness on HT?
Anti-trafficking campaigns
Empower institutions to counter HT
Create more awareness
Get right personnel
Entrench HT in the curriculum
Introduction of anti-trafficking policies
Use media to inform more
Declare HT a national crisis

Question 5
What do you see as the role of the church and the larger religious community in Kenya, in combating human trafficking?
Create conversations about HT
Advice government on policy making
Make the church watch dogs
Church should be united against HT
Church to lobby more with stakeholders

Question 6
When it comes to engagement with the human trafficking victims
• What do you think are their needs
• How should the Church, society and government respond to these needs
Security can offer: Basic needs, Confidentiality, Counseling, Referral, Health, Economic support and empowerment, and Comprehensive assistance.
B. Church can offer Spiritual intervention, and Rescue centres
C. Society can Embrace victims, Build rescue centres
Government can Arrest perpetrators offer Security and financial support

Question 7
What strategic steps would you suggest for EAK to take in order to begin working on human trafficking in Kenya?
Spread to 47 counties
Use media to create more awareness
Partner with other stake holders

Training and more seminars Group 4
Question 1
As you think about Kenya, what thoughts and feelings come to mind regarding Human Trafficking Situation?
An old long phenomenon but has not been addressed outwardly
More communication needs to be done
A limited number of people know about HT

A thriving business with certain entities protecting it
Clergy need to be more involved in matters HT

Question 2
What social and economic conditions exist in Kenya that make your target group either vulnerable disregard or tolerate human trafficking concerns?
Lack of knowledge on what human trafficking is
Negative competition among ministries dealing with it
Greed, compromise competition, comparison
People feel it is not their calling
Fear of consequences if preached .e.g. losing members of the church
Poverty and poverty alienation

Question 3
How much do you think the ordinary Kenyan knows and understands the human Trafficking
Very little or limited knowledge and understanding about HT. Some people know about it but do not understand is magnitude

Question 4
What can the government do to raise awareness on HT?
Give more knowledge and information to the clergy
Do awareness campaigns
Do workshops in churches concerning HT
Do seminars with different stakeholders
Empower organizations to reach the grassroots
Use drama music festivals to raise more awareness

Question 5
What do you see as the role of the church and the larger religious community in Kenya, in combating human trafficking?
Educate the congregations
Reporting the perpetrators and suspects of HT
Show availability to organizations dealing with HT
Use social media and pulpit to talk about HT
Collaborate with other organizations dealing with HT
Resume, restore and rehabilitate victims
Engage government in policy making high levels

Question 6
When it comes to engagement with the human trafficking victims
• What do you think are their needs
• How should the Church, society and government respond to these needs
a) Offer psychological and social support
Spiritual support
b)
Offer professional counseling
Prayers but in context
Refer to the right arm of support
Rehabilitation support centres for education short term or long term
Offer medical support
Make strong and social and political demands
Identify the problem and raise it to the right organizations
Raise resources for immediate and long term support
Have effective specialized departments that deal with victims
Implement programs effectively
Provide half way shelters for victims

Question 7
What strategic steps would you suggest for EAK to take in order to begin working on human trafficking in Kenya?
Create more platforms to educate strategic partnership
Collaborate with government to make good policies
Put political demands on government
Raise funds for shelter half way
Use media for advocacy
Develop training modules for church teachers.
Way Forward: Rev. Connie Kivuti, General Secretary EAK
Request the government to discuss HT for the fact that sexual exploitation is real big business out here.
Christ interacted with the sinners and prostitutes hence as the church we need to relook at the love of God in order to create positive impact as far as the HT vice is concerned.
As EAK and MICAH Global, the desire is to mobilize other stake holders more in the fight against HT, through conferences, seminars and all other possible avenues.
Vulnerability of rural girls should be countered and empowerment done.
As a nation, we need to mend our torn moral fabric, go back and strengthen the family because as the family goes so does the society.
Results of the Consultative Workshop should be to reassure Kenyans about their valued dignity and provide safe space for victims.
Empowerment of vulnerable constituent groups for positive impact amongst us and rehabilitate the HT victims are key inputs.
Developing of IEC materials that can be used for raising more public awareness is vital. Do posters for vulnerable and notorious counties on HT
ON 30/07/2019 participate in adopting World Human Trafficking Day as part of our calendar activities.
Do drama and music festivals on sensitizing and creating awareness on HT issues.
Ask the government to fill in the existing gaps in our laws and legal framework on HT
Speak about HT from our pulpits and available podiums.
• Prohibit, prevent, prosecute and protect victims of HT
• Increase funding in the Trust fund and Advisory boards to deal with HT easily
• Operationalize some laws which are not yet operational
• Provide increased funding for investigators
• Provide oversight on the institutions accountable for this

Closing Ceremony: Hon. Sabina Chege’s Closing remarks
Politicians and churches should have a close working relationship
Government does the oversight and policies but it is not the implementer of the same. The executive is
Hon. Sabina Chege promised to spearhead the place where the laws of HT can be amended
She also promised to champion the issue of funs allocation in the businesses of women and children
She Committed to mobilize many politicians against the issue of HT and can be the contact person in parliament as far as HT is concerned
It was apparent that sometimes we are the perpetrators of the same vice by keeping quiet while the abuse continues in homes (like mistreatments of our children and relatives)
The Hon. Member of Parliament encouraged the delegates to take charge by becoming champions and advocates against HT even as she quoted Mark16:15
Being the Chairperson of the parliamentary committee heading Health, the MP mentioned that children between the ages of 18-24 are at risk of drug abuse, and drug abusers are victims of mental health as opposed to being perpetrators
30% of girls in Kenya are getting children under the age of 19 hence children need to be saved
Get a friendlier education curriculum in schools.
The Member of Parliament Hon. Sabina Chege promised to walk with EAK on this and other matters affecting humanity in Kenya.

6.0: CONCLUSION
EAK needs to build local and national mechanisms to address the specific needs of human trafficking victims in Kenya. Trafficked persons often find themselves enslaved in situations where they are disempowered, where they are held against their will, where they often suffer violent abuse, where their families are threatened with harm, and where they are bonded by a debt that they have little or no chance of ever repaying. Because of their irregular status, they are usually afraid to seek help from law enforcement officials, who treat them as irregular migrants rather than victims of trafficking.
With the support of the church which is a grassroots based movement, the trends of human trafficking could be reversed, viewing our country as a “source” country, from which victims are recruited or obtained, or “transit” country through which traffickers transport their victims en route to their destination countries. With a united front comprising various churches we can be each person’s keeper.
The broader East African context is hot spot for human trafficking. A number of factors come together to create the perfect storm for trafficking to thrive. These are: wars, poverty, limited access to healthcare and education, gender inequalities, conflict, high unemployment, and a general lack of opportunities, especially for women. The general belief is when the church comes together to address this issue of human trafficking, the problem and the situation can change.
The church can also use its moral influence to address challenges of internal (national) trafficking. A majority of internal (national) trafficking victims are thought to be children. The failure of the extended family support systems leads to cheap labour recruitment which is perhaps the single largest problem relating to trafficking at the moment. The lack of awareness on the risks of trafficking can exacerbate the problem, as traffickers prey on ignorance.